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In August, Munir Mohammed finished a mural on the front of Oasis International, across from the Dialysis Center. It's a realist montage of a doctor checking a man's blood pressure, teens near a bus, the king and queen of Nigeria, thatched-roof cottages, and women studying, dancing, and getting a diploma. Mohammed aims to celebrate African heritage and promote education among local black youths. "This set of murals is much more about community information and education," he tells me. "They're like billboards."

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  Topics: Museum And Gallery , STREET ART, Providence, murals
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ARTICLES BY GREG COOK
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