Act Two begins with one of his former dungeon-mates telling the Pharoah (Michael John Lewis) how Joseph correctly interpreted his dream to mean that he would escape execution. The Pharoah has been having dreams that no one can figure out, so Joseph is brought in to do so and promptly does. Soon he is the Pharaoh's right-hand man, and his predictions assure that the country will survive famine and prosper. When his starving brothers come to Egypt because food there is plentiful, they appear at the court begging. They don't recognize Joseph as he does them, so he puts them to a test, falsely accusing one of theft. When they stand behind their mistreated brother and offer to share punishment, Joseph knows they have changed, reveals himself, and forgives them.

Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat was intended by its Old Testament author to be a morality tale exemplifying how virtue is rewarded. Not a bad hope, as Judeo-Christian aspirations go.

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