Review: LFK

By BRIAN DUFF  |  August 1, 2012

Also on the menu are several versions of a baked sandwich called a "pasty" — a British baked good akin to empanadas and Hot Pockets. In LFK's take on the traditional Cornish version, the crust was terrific — flaky and buttery. The beef brisket inside offered more richness than meaty flavor. The root vegetables had been caramelized to bring out the sugars. LFK's version of carnitas tacos gives the slow-braised pork an unusual sweetness, like it had cooked with brown sugar. There was plenty of tender meat, a nice sour slaw, and chive-y crema, all on tortillas that had a fresh char.

LFK stands for Longfellow Fellowship of Knights — a much better moniker for a drinking establishment than something literary. The knights of old were barely literate contract workers, living from job to job, wracked by status anxiety and mutual suspicion — much like ourselves. They called themselves fellows just to remember not to kill each other, and drank in order to stand each other. A few drinks at LFK and it's easy to forget our misgivings about our fellows, and to amuse each other with words that are not worth writing down.

LFK | 188A State St, Portland | 4pm-1am daily | Visa/MC/Amex | 207.899.3277 | lfkportland.com

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