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The best films of 2011 are not the ballyhooed

Also-rans
By PETER KEOUGH  |  December 21, 2011

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The films this year were kind of like the current field of Republican presidential candidates: some are entertaining, but there's no clear frontrunner, and there's more attention on the flashiest and least substantial than on the more thoughtful and genuine. In other words, too much emphasis on The Artist and Hugo and not enough on Margaret (my psersonal pick for best film of the year). The latter, abandoned by its studio but embraced by the critics, is kind of like the Jon Huntsman — or Tim Pawlenty — of 2011 movies. Some of the others on my list are getting more of a run for their money, but you have to look beyond the hype to see that this is an above average year in film.

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