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Review: L!fe Happens

Not much happening in L!fe Happens
By PETER KEOUGH  |  April 11, 2012
1.5 1.5 Stars

In the opening scene of Kat Coiro's comedy, roommates Kim (Krysten Ritter) and Deena (Kate Bosworth), eager one-night stands waiting in their beds, both reach for a condom in the communal stash. But only one remains, and Deena grabs it. "One year later" reads the subtitle, and Kim's social and professional life has crumbled because she has a baby. People shrink from her in horror (this is LA), men literally run away, and she's left cleaning up baby puke and picking up shit at her job as a dog walker. I don't buy it. First, not that she's required to have one, but was abortion not an option? It's never mentioned, let alone discussed. And really, does having a baby make you a pariah? I'd say the opposite is the case. And finally, who needs the Republicans to wage war on women when filmmakers like Coiro make supposedly hip movies that promote the same sexist attitudes. Life happens, but this is a crock of sh!t.

  Topics: Reviews , Movie Reviews, babies, Krysten Ritter,  More more >
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