FIND MOVIES
Movie List
Loading ...
or
Find Theaters and Movie Times
or
Search Movies

The Amazing Spider-Man 3-D July 3

Of all the big franchises reprised this summer, this one seems the shakiest. After dropping Spider-Man 4 in 2008, the studio, Sony, has started from scratch. Peter Parker is once again a moody, arachnoid teenager, played this time by Andrew Garfield, and Emma Stone is his pre–Mary Jane girlfriend, Gwen. Trouble ensues when Parker finds a mystery suitcase that compels him to delve into his past and recall when his parents disappeared and he fell into a cave and developed a morbid case of chiroptophobia . . . I'm sorry, I'm confusing it with Batman Begins. Anyway, Rhys Ifans plays a villain called, simply, "The Lizard." And it's in 3-D. (But they didn't cast Donald Glover, so how good can it be?) Marc Webb of (500) Days of Summer fame directs.

< prev  1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |   next >
  Topics: Features , Alex Pettyfer, Channing Tatum, The Dark Knight Rises,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY PETER KEOUGH
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   BUFFET DINING: THE 15TH BOSTON UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 19, 2013
    "Copraphagy" is a key word at this year's Boston Underground Film Festival at the Brattle.
  •   REVIEW: GINGER & ROSA  |  March 19, 2013
    Sally Potter likes to mess around with form and narrative.
  •   UNDERGROUND CINEMA: THE 12TH BOSTON TURKISH FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 12, 2013
    This year's Boston Turkish Film Festival includes works in which directors ponder the relationships between the secular and the religious, between men and women, and between destiny and identity.
  •   REVIEW: A GLIMPSE INSIDE THE MIND OF CHARLES SWAN III  |  March 12, 2013
    In Roman Coppola's sophomoric second feature (his 2001 debut CQ was promising), Charlie Sheen shows restraint as the titular asshole, a dissolute ad designer and solipsistic whiner who's mooning over the loss of his latest love.
  •   REVIEW: UPSIDE DOWN  |  March 14, 2013
    Had Ed Wood Jr. directed Fritz Lang's Metropolis , he couldn't have achieved the earnest dopiness of Juan Solanas's sci-fi allegory — nor the striking images.

 See all articles by: PETER KEOUGH