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Review: Prometheus

Ridley Scott's monumental and busy return
By PETER KEOUGH  |  June 7, 2012
3.0 3.0 Stars

Unfortunately, none of these points-of-view offer much focus for the onslaught of catastrophes, wonders, gross-outs, and sometimes witty, sometimes pat allusions to many other movies besides 2001 and the others in the series. It's exhilarating, but also distracting. If someone is battling a beast equipped with scores of sprouting vaginae-dentatae, or if a zombie shows up at the front door and crushes your skull, or a giant phallic parasite engages in oral rape — not to mention a birth scene that rivals that of Alien — the search for truth seems secondary. Now if Scott could somehow have spliced the DNA of the first movie with that of the Kubrickian masterpiece that he just can't shake, then he'd have an Alien that was truly strange.

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