FIND MOVIES
Movie List
Loading ...
or
Find Theaters and Movie Times
or
Search Movies

Tyler Perry’s The Family that Preys

The filmic equivalent of Velveeta
By BROOKE HOLGERSON  |  September 17, 2008
1.0 1.0 Stars
Tyler-Perry-inside.jpg

The prolific Tyler Perry is at it again, offering subpar entertainment to audiences so starved for sustenance they’ll eat his cheese. This one opened in second place at the box office last weekend, but don’t let that fool you; it’s the filmic equivalent of Velveeta. Perry’s writing would be considered over the top on Melrose Place. He delivers 10 clunkers for every laugh, 20 clichés and absurd plot contrivances for every earned emotion. If The Family That Preys works at all, it’s because his actors are busily earning their paychecks. Each of his films attracts an increasingly talented cast, and in this one Alfre Woodard as a socialite and Kathy Bates as a working woman struggle mightily to animate their cardboard characters. That they succeed at all is a testament to their skill. That others, like Sanaa Lathan and Cole Hauser, fail is hardly their fault. Blame it on Perry, who leaves his actors without a prayer. 111 minutes | Boston Common + Fenway + Fresh Pond + Suburbs
  Topics: Reviews , Entertainment, Movies, Tyler Perry,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY BROOKE HOLGERSON
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   REVIEW: PAUL BLART: MALL COP  |  January 20, 2009
    If you find the sight of a grown man rolling around the mall on a Segway hilarious, this is the movie for you.
  •   TYLER PERRY’S THE FAMILY THAT PREYS  |  September 17, 2008
    The prolific Tyler Perry is at it again, offering subpar entertainment to audiences so starved for sustenance they’ll eat his cheese.
  •   THE ROCKER  |  August 20, 2008
    Rainn Wilson of The Office gets promoted to the big screen with this anemic comedy directed by The Full Monty helmer Peter Cattaneo.
  •   KIT KITTREDGE: AN AMERICAN GIRL  |  July 01, 2008
    Although her film has as much visual flair as an after-school special, director Patricia Rozema gives an appealing attention to period detail, and Breslin is sweet in her first starring role.
  •   REPRISE  |  May 21, 2008
    Trier captures the moment when the recklessness of youth gives way to adult responsibilities, and the way childhood friendships can fall apart when different paths are taken.

 See all articles by: BROOKE HOLGERSON