Zach Jones gets all Smokey and Wonder-ous

Better and better
By SAM PFEIFLE  |  June 13, 2012

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DEALING IT STRAIGHT Zach Jones has recreated and reimagined himself as a soul singer on his latest album.
Isn't Zach Jones a guitar player? He certainly was with Rocktopus/As Fast As, on his following two solo records, and as a sideman for the likes of Pete Kilpatrick and Aaron Lee Marshall and Amy Allen. A sinewy and smart guitar player, actually, with subtle tone and great instincts.

And yet, on the brand-new Things Were Better, it would appear he doesn't play a single note, handing off guitar duties to the likes of Max Cantlin (Fogcutters/Anna and the Diggs, etc.) and Anthony Drouin (Lady Zen's backing band, the Lazy Suzans, etc.), so that he can focus solely on lead vocals. He has reimagined/recreated himself here as a 1960s soul singer, à la Smokey Robinson with the Miracles, and it is really easy on the ears.

Or better yet, Stevie Wonder's break-through record, the precocious and infectious Up-Tight, where Stevie went from child prodigy to songwriter and soul-singer. Jones shoots for the moon, with falsetto and drive and a terrific mix of easy soul and just plain good times.

The opening and title track, especially, is a keeper. Penned by Jon Nolan, who recorded the album at his Milltown Studios and did just about everything right in getting the organic sound this record needed, "Things Were Better" fires up with a guitar tone like walking barefoot onto the back lawn on a warm summer night and when Jones's vocals enter he's so fucking charming I was hoping he'd offer to buy me a drink. Then it gets better. The pacing is terrific, somehow both a rave-up and relaxed, with a sense of urgency and real passion, but nothing forced. It's deep-seated. Enough so that "I need you like a bird needs feathers" doesn't sound remotely corny. There are classic Motown "yeeea-aaah" guttural wails and sax duets from Kyle Hardy and Brian Graham and I'm pretty sure Bryan Brash and Tim Garrett chime in with viola and cello at one point or another.

It's a listen-10-times-in-a-row kind of song.

In the same way that Aloe Blacc couldn't hope to sustain the intensity of "I Need a Dollar" for the whole of Good Things, however, not every song here is that terrific. "If You Don't Care" feels like an idea that didn't completely come together, a ballad without resolution. "Wish I Could Dance," despite being a hell of a lot of fun, comes off a tad anachronistic, a song that lives in a sitcom. In the same way Kurt Baker performs — okay, lives — in a pure-pop alternate universe and the Tricky Britches still write train songs in black-and-white, Jones is taking us outside of our everyday existences by conjuring a shimmering past that reminds us (maybe for the first time) of what used to be.

"Hard to Get" is a sugar-pie-honey-bunch number where the piano is mixed excellently to the center of the left channel, commanding your attention, but not stealing the spotlight. "Just out of Reach" teams Jones with Anna Lombard, like Otis Redding with Carla Thomas (that King & Queen is not on iTunes is a shame), a song with give and take and a playful sexuality.

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  Topics: CD Reviews , Carla Thomas, Aloe Blacc, Jon Nolan,  More more >
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