Underneath, drummer John Kennedy has some room for fills that drive what would be a terrific gig closer, and there is some punctuating rhythm guitar early that might remind of the Hold Steady — a band Sun Gods in Exile may hate, truth be told — and leads into a fucking epic (not sure how else to describe it) classic rock guitar solo.

My personal jam here, though, is "Writing's On The Wall," where John Lennon's bass gets your right foot heavy right out of the gate and Chris Neal's keyboard provides the rising action. Like the Van Halen version of "Dancing in the Streets," this is a flamethrower and a hell of a lot of fun.

There wouldn't be much point if it weren't. There's nothing didactic or mysterious here. But neither is it a throwaway. This is an album with substance and grit and, yeah, plenty of silver linings.

THANKS FOR THE SILVER | Released by Sun Gods in Exile | on Small Stone Records | with Humanoids + Motor Creeps | at Geno's, in Portland | March 16 |  smallstone.com/artistinfo.php?artist=51&s=sungods

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