Today his vision is simply an established feature of the capital city. The infamous intersection known as "Suicide Circle" is no more. The river is lined with walkways and restaurants. And Warner's aesthetic fingerprints remain on a key architectural feature Geake lovingly describes in his book's final chapter: "His elegant bow-like construction at the confluence of the Woonasquatucket and Moshassuck points outward as a reminder of how ships of old once faced open water."

The Brown Bookstore will host a reading and book signing for Robert Gaeke's A History of the Providence River at 5:30 p.m. on March 5.

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