In it for the honey

By VIKKI WARNER  |  June 12, 2013

“In most cases, I think it’s more exciting not to know where it’s going to end,” he says. “I’ve often had to learn how to do something I’ve never done before in order to make the art that I want to make. It’s exciting to invest in this process and try to create something out of it.”

As the hives fill up and the spring wears on, Lutz finds himself fielding questions from intrigued onlookers.

“I’ve encountered a lot of people I don’t know who just want to talk to me about it, and that’s never really happened to me with the art that I’ve made,” he says. “This somehow has a broader appeal.”

For more information on Grove St. Apiary, visit grovestapiary.squarespace.com or facebook.com/beehiveindustries.

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    The flavor of the honey produced by Grove St. Apiary, according to its proprietor Peter Lutz, is in part attributable to the linden trees common to the West Side of the Providence. Bees don’t have to travel far to collect a variety of plant pollens in such a concentrated urban environment, Lutz says, so his honey is uniquely dense and flowery.

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