An interesting example of Sager's suggestion is Sister Therese Antone, a Lifespan board member and president of Salve Regina University in Newport. Having taken a vow of poverty as a Sister of Mercy, Antone receives no salary for running the Catholic university, according to its federal tax return, and only $25,000 in benefits. (Antone did not return phone calls from the Phoenix.)

Overall, however, says Koller, executive salaries are a small portion of the $6 billion to $7 billion that Rhode Island spends on health-care each year. "Do they affect affordability of heath insurance in Rhode Island?" he asks. "Probably not."

James Purcell, president and CEO of Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Rhode Island, the state's largest insurer, declined to be interviewed for this story. Discussing hospital CEO pay "is not the right fit for us," explains spokesman Chet Lasell. (According to the company's financial filing with the state Department of Business Regulation, Purcell received $965,646 in compensation in 2007.)

CORRECTION: In “Health-care’s big moneyman in New England” (February 13), it was incorrectly stated that in 2007, Lifespan CEO George Vecchione’s compensation package exceeded the second-highest paid New England health-care CEO’s total by almost $1 million. Lahey Clinic CEO David Barrett received $2.6 million in compensation and benefits, or $333,599 less than Vecchione, according to the clinic’s federal tax return. While Vecchione was the region’s highest-paid health-care CEO, the story overlooked Barrett’s information, citing James Mongan of Boston’s Partners HealthCare System as the second-highest-earning CEO. Mongan is third on the list. Scott Hartman, director of communications and marketing for Lahey, notes that Barrett’s compensation rose in 2007 because of a one-time supplemental retirement benefit. In 2006, when Vecchione also received $2.9 million, Barrett received $1.4 million — $1.5 million less than Vecchione.

Steven Stycos can be reached at steven@stycos.com.

< prev  1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  | 
  Topics: News Features , Barack Obama, Boston, New England,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY STEVEN STYCOS
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   AN UNLIKELY CLASH: WIND DEVELOPERS AND ENVIRONMENTALISTS  |  January 13, 2010
    The growing push for wind power in Rhode Island is creating friction between wind developers and an unlikely group of critics: environmentalists.
  •   AN OBAMA CONFIDANT ON THE SURGE IN AFGHANISTAN  |  December 02, 2009
    Twenty-four hours before President Barack Obama announced a 30,000-troop escalation of the Afghan War, one of his key foreign policy advisors provided a view of the president’s thinking at Brown University.
  •   DEBATING THE MIDDLE EAST MUDDLE  |  June 17, 2009
    US military aid to Pakistan and Afghanistan is being wasted and should be redirected to the police and moderate non-violent groups working for education and the rule of law, according to two Middle East experts who spoke Sunday at the Community Church of Providence.
  •   BATTLE OVER OPEN SPACE IN NORTH PROVIDENCE  |  May 27, 2009
    Will the last large piece of open space in North Providence turn into the site of 47 single family homes? That decision currently rests with the Rhode Island General Assembly and the Rhode Island Supreme Court. The outcome could jeopardize open space preservation statewide.
  •   YOU SNUS YOU LOSE  |  May 13, 2009
    Unbowed by last month's $1 a pack increase in the cigarette tax, the tobacco industry is pushing new unhealthy products to gain more Rhode Island customers.

 See all articles by: STEVEN STYCOS