In search of light

By MEGAN GRUMBLING  |  April 28, 2010

Likewise is less often more in terms of performance. While the lovely, mellifluous seals and the colorful bravado of the Moon and Wind are rich diversions, most grounding is Landry’s beautifully simple poise and physical gesture as Inook. With a subtle stylization entirely appropriate to the stakes and aesthetic of myth, Landry takes on human feelings common to all of us, and elevates them with carefully amplified, almost ceremonial movements and poses — air sliced in anger, a head bowed in sadness, even the slouchy, oh-shit resignation of being caught somewhere he’s not supposed to be. It is in the ritualized grace of Inook’s emotions that it’s easiest to feel the immediacy of his plight, and both the timelessness and the timeliness of his realization: When we stride forth to have our blithe way with nature, our story, too, must finally come around to humility.

Megan Grumbling can be reached at mgrumbling@hotmail.com.

INOOK AND THE SUN | by Henry Beissel | Directed by Assunta Kent | Produced by the University of Southern Maine Department of Theatre | through May 2 | 207.780.5151

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