New directions

By GREG COOK  |  July 14, 2010

Jonggeon Lee's Bridge of Paradise is a crafty tour de force: old floorboards engraved with stylized flowers and trees, as though the design of an Afghani rug had imprinted itself into the floor. Garett Yahn installs couches, a TV, a video game, a music-entertainment center, and photocopied essays on topics like "Art and Objecthood" to create a treatise in slacker guise on what can be called art. Memorable oddities include Lara Woolfson's photo of a woman in a white shirt and no pants holding a white horse and You Jin Kim's photo of a woman in a Disney Cinderella gown sitting on a toilet.

Finally, compare Kirk Amaral Snow's Sometimes It's Hard To Move On, a pair of fans blowing against the pages of a book of fairy tales set between them, with Curtis Singmaster's Struggle, an oscillating fan lying on the floor and twisting back and forth like a beetle on its back. They represent the show's most unexpected trend/coincidence: fans.

Read Greg Cook's blog at gregcookland.com/journal.

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  Topics: Museum And Gallery , Entertainment, Boston University, Photographic Resource Center,  More more >
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