Moor power for free

By CAROLYN CLAY  |  August 8, 2010

Patrick Lynch contributes a stark, simple set with gray revolves as heavy as tablets, and David Remedios's electronic clangs and rumblings make for an atmospheric underlay. As Desdemona's lady and Iago's cowed wife, Emilia, Adrianne Krstansky starts out mousy but rises powerfully to the occasion of exposing her spouse. Grayson Powell is overwrought as Iago's chump, Roderigo. But Trinity Rep vet Fred Sullivan Jr. is as forceful a Brabantio as you are like to see. He's one reason the opening scenes crackle as they do. Unfortunately, he's thrown away thereafter. This viewer was itching to pluck him out of the trash and recycle him as Iago.

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  Topics: Theater , Boston Common, Boston Common, Commonwealth Shakespeare Company,  More more >
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