For this play, Mamet drew on his brief experiences in a real estate office — Gamm points out that he was not a salesman but a typist, just tapping away, listening. He dedicated Glengarry Glen Ross to Harold Pinter, whose influence shows in the blunt directness of the dialogue and its demand on a director to pay close attention to pacing, as Sullivan certainly does. Especially with fast talkers like these, sometimes more meaning can be conveyed when nothing is said than in the words themselves.

Greed is good, the Gordon Gekkos of the business world insist, using their success as manifest proof. Good for them. At least we can take comfort in the discomfort of such reptiles-in-training as these salesmen and be reminded that there is a cost to relinquishing one's conscience.

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