"I can't imagine anyone else holding it down," she adds. "Really, she owns it. Her wisdom and her age only add to the role nine years later."

As for the two other dances, they have much to offer as well. Fly . . . but Don't . . impressed Jack Anderson in the New York Times, who described Gotzkowsky's works as "belligerence in small packages ... There's nothing timid about [her] dances." Meunier discovered her choreography in New York two years ago and immediately "felt it was a fit for us." She appreciates the lyricism of the work and the difficulty of it also being highly physical.

"This dance is an abstract rumination on themes of control, manipulation, the desire for freedom and the restraining of it," she says. "It is both sensuous and aloof, a study in contrasts."

The last piece, Elliptic/Stippling Line, is one of the oldest pieces in the Fusionworks repertoire and one of their audience's all-time favorites.

"A serene solo is followed by three dancers acting as jumping automatons, who just keep jumping and jumping and jumping," Meunier describes. "Folks are always mesmerized by it. I love it."

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