Calling Kahlil

By STEVE VINEBERG  |  April 22, 2011

It's a pity Karam sells his character down the river, abruptly, in the second act. Here's the trajectory of Timothy's relationship with Joseph: they sleep together at the end of act one, and by act two Joseph has stopped taking Timothy's calls because Timothy hasn't stopped covering his family's story, and to add insult to injury, he's decided that Joseph's illness is psychosomatic. The play ends, though, in a moment of affirmation when Joseph rediscovers his compassionate kindergarten teacher (Lizbeth Mackay) in a physio clinic and they work out together. The night I saw the show, the audience cheered.

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