Peg the tipping point to Jane Jacobs's 1961 book The Death and Life of Great American Cities, which argued that car-centered urban development was killing communities, and Rachel Carson's 1962 book Silent Spring, which detailed how chemical pesticides originally designed to free humanity from disease were in fact killing the world. Looking back, you wonder: were the late 19th-century cartoon satirists the real visionaries?

Read Greg Cook's blog at gregcookland.com/journal.

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  •   PERFECTLY HUMAN  |  April 16, 2014
    Sometimes I think you can understand everything about our society today by considering it through two themes — the perfection of technology versus the messily human handmade.
  •   THE LAST FRONTIER  |  April 02, 2014
    They say that temperatures in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica haven’t been above freezing in millennia.
  •   ASSURED ABSTRACTIONS  |  March 19, 2014
    “The golden age of abstraction is right now,” ARTnews informed me last spring.
  •   COMMON GROUND  |  March 12, 2014
    “I did everything in the world to keep this from happening,” exclaims the assistant to the rich man in Kerry Tribe’s There Will Be ___ _.
  •   LOCAL LUMINARIES  |  March 05, 2014
    Reenacting a childhood photo, portraits of fabulous old ladies, and dollhouse meditations on architecture are among the artworks featured in the “2014 RISCA Fellowship Exhibition.”

 See all articles by: GREG COOK