Time Stands Still at The Lyric

By CAROLYN CLAY  |  February 28, 2012

Scott Edmiston's production brings out both the snappiness and the melancholy in Time Stands Still. And Laura Latreille anchors the piece with a convincingly testy turn, punctuated by a warm rat-a-tat laugh, as the sharp-edged Sarah, who effectively nurses her injuries even during the scene changes. Barlow Adamson's James is loyal, likeable, and makes an eloquent plea for normalcy. Erica Spyres's innocent bourgeois of a Mandy draws some easy laughs but also asks some penetrating questions, among them "What is an ordinary person to do" with the riveting images of suffering Sarah risks her life to capture? And the terrific Jeremiah Kissel marshals both the seasoned cynic and the sheepish romantic in Richard. Dewey Dellay provides the camera-shutter-punctuated, Eastern-tinged sound design. And Janie E. Howland supplies the aptly trendy/grubby lair that serves as temporary touch-down for folks whose real lives have been lived out of a series of suitcases in a succession of hells.

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