Though at times the pacing feels strained — starting Oswald off with such intensity foreshortens his arc; I yearned to linger longer in Mrs. Alving's devastating "we are all ghosts" monologue — Carlsen and Schroeder visually constellate the characters' rising tensions exquisitely, especially through and around the windows: the white flash of Regina's eyes through the rain, Oswald's close-set eyes gazing at his own image in horrific self-knowledge as Mrs. Alving looks on in torture.

Once again, Lorem Ipsum has bracingly recreated itself. The sophisticated artistic convergence of Ghosts exceeds the company's precedents for challenging, inventive, and luminous theater. Once again, I am transported, grateful, and already thirsty for what they will do next.

Megan Grumbling can be reached at  mgrumbling@hotmail.com.

GHOSTS | by Henrik Ibsen | Directed by Ian Carlsen and Nicholas Schroeder | With Art Design by Jessica Townes George and Mariah Bergeron | Film by Derek Kimball and David Meiklejohn | Produced by Lorem Ipsum, at SPACE Gallery | through April 1 | 207.828.5600 |  space538.org

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