Other actors are impressive. Ed Franklin plays the soon-to-be-late King Duncan in an interesting way, as a friendly guy delighted to have his job; his demise is all the more stark for the contrast. As the drunken porter who tardily answers banging at the gate (right after a fraught scene with the Macbeths dripping blood), Paul Romero makes sure we are having as much fun as he is.

Crucial characterizations are former military comrade Macduff and his wife, whom he has left unguarded at home after fleeing Macbeth. In her brief scene, Marion Markham provides Lady Macduff with enough gentle personality for us to especially care when she and her two children are slain by the new king's thugs. With that background, the reaction of J.P. Driscoll's Macduff is affectingly muted and understated, since we are already grieving with him.

Whether in spite of all the gore or because of it, Macbeth in Wilcox Park is a bloody good show.

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  Topics: Theater , Enrique Bravo, Harland Meltzer, MACBETH,  More more >
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