IS THERE A CHARACTER THAT YOU FIND EASIEST TO WRITE, OR THAT YOU HAVE A NATURAL AFFINITY FOR? The easiest one to write was Frank Mackey [protagonist of Faithful Place]. That kind of hard, fast, very dark sense of humor makes everything easier to write. I'd most like to go for a pint with Cassie [protagonist of The Likeness]. The one I'm fondest of, though, is Rob, because that was my first. There I was, desperately broke and turning down acting jobs so I could finish In the Woods. I think putting that kind of investment into a book is going to make you feel very fond of that character forevermore. He's where it all started.

WHO'S THE NARRATOR FOR YOUR NEXT BOOK? It's Stephen Moran from Faithful Place, the young sidekick. The whole idea is that Frank's daughter Holly is 16 now, and at her private boarding school they've got a bulletin board where the girls can stick up secrets that they want to reveal anonymously. She has found on this board, and brought to Stephen, a postcard that has a photograph of a teenage boy who was murdered a year ago, and a caption that reads, "I know who killed him." So, Stephen has to team up with the detective and work the case. So, I'm about halfway through, and I think I know who's done it, but that could all change.

TANA FRENCH READS AT BROOKLINE BOOKSMITH ON JULY 26.

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