This production is as well-cast as it is well-performed. Goldbach's Dracula has a shaved head, which emphasizes his being physically imposing (as the Mexican bandit in Blazing Saddles might have said in the first draft, "Hair? We don't need no stinking hair!"). The young women are convincingly lovely, and the romantic men are handsome. Josephs's Renfield conveys a frustrated sense of humor now and then, appropriate to his absurd compulsion.

By the way, if you come to this show with kids and want to get spooked, you might consider buying a ticket for the haunted house tour that is also going on at the Courthouse. Gibbering ghouls jumping out at you around each turn is bound to quicken your pulse. Bram Stoker would approve.

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  Topics: Theater , Bram Stoker, Courthouse Center for the Arts, Dracula
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