How about them apples?

By GREG COOK  |  June 26, 2013

She’s worked in a motion picture film lab and for a video production firm. On her website, Marro notes that from 2007 to ’11, she “played the part of ‘business lady’ as the managing director of the epic and revolutionary art space AS220, where [I] crafted endless spreadsheets and reports documenting the possibility of an organized egalitarian approach to art making as a transmutative tool in generating beauty, achieving equality, next level human consciousness, and putting a final an end to humanity’s terrible habit of endless war-making.”

Which gives a sense of the utopian vision that generally underlies even her most dazzle-eyed fantasies — from clock-headed characters to the drunken “fairy godmother/narrator” Madame Von Malt Liquor with her dress laced together from liquor boxes (a hole is cut in the front of the skirt to serve as a puppet theater).

Marro’s new apples and snakes, she notes, put her in Adam and Eve territory. “When I found myself working in and around that story there was definitely a sense that there was a conversation about the way that our world does see female power and female empowerment as dangerous,” she says.

“As much as I think it just comes from the fear of the unknown or something, it is such a change from the way that society has been for so long that I can understand why it gives people anxiety. But at the same time, there is nothing to fear in equality and different approaches to power. And I always hope that it’s a different approach to power.”

Read Greg Cook’s blog at gregcookland.com/journal.

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