Maximal minimalism

By GREG COOK  |  February 19, 2014

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GEOMETRIC Ott's stingle 6.

Jacqueline Ott operates in similar pattern-filled territory. She likes to develop designs based on permutations of basic pencil marks or painted geometric shapes. In her 2014 stingle series, she fills squares or circles with groups of curves that begin to suggest tree branches and leaves. The flat patterns look like studies for corporate logos, which to be honest doesn’t do a lot for me.

But I’ve long been taken with Ott’s di series from 2009 and ’10. She paints rings and draws hatched lines that become nest-like circles. Like Masters, her drawings are generally organized along grids. But here the designs repeat in light and dark tones, looking like fractal patterns of snowflakes or starbursts dancing into and out from space.

Follow Greg Cook on Twitter @AestheticRasear.

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