Mucho Ado

By BILL RODRIGUEZ  |  October 24, 2006

The set by Michael McGarty populates the stage with tall, sunset-colored columns and twisted rebar forms that remind us of dry desert plants. That’s all well and good, but a working fountain that fills the center of the stage is a disaster, not only drowning out occasional words but also failing to pass for objects such as a bed in indoor scenes, a bedspread and pillow notwithstanding.

This play was first performed in 1598, Shakespeare having busied himself with three history plays and a tragedy in the prior two or three years after amusing himself with A Midsummer Night’s Dream. It was not far from his thoughts that tragic consequences result when the sort of evil fabrication that Much Ado pivots on go unmasked. But the Bard wasn’t yet in the mood to write Othello.

Emigh points out in the program notes that the standard Spanish translation of the play’s title is Mucho Ruido y Poco Nueces — A Lot of Noise and Few Nuances. What an appropriate play to put on in an election season.

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