Documentary evidence

By GREG COOK  |  February 27, 2008

Hall’s subject is fame and her persona as a big gal in big glasses, big hair, gem sweaters, and form-fitting gold lamé jumpsuits. She offers catchy neo-new-wave music videos, gumball machines selling gem-sweater buttons and CD singles, and three large paint-by-number-style paintings. One of these last, Dawn of the Diva, shows her with a shotgun standing atop an RV parked in front of the Mall of America as a crowd of fans — or maybe zombies — surround her. The work suggests that Hall is feeling her way around — sort of in between things — but it’s fun.

And while you’re there, check out Jamaica Plain artist Laurel Sparks’s seven paintings, in which chandeliers are the jumping-off point for charming, poppy, glittery abstract art.

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