Gone but not forgotten

She Loves Me at the Huntington; plus Way Theatre Artists’ The Memory of Water
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  May 27, 2008

080530_inside_lovesme
SHE LOVES ME Nicholas Martin’s Huntington farewell has “A Romantic Atmosphere.”

Before there was eHarmony, there were harmony and disharmony, and Jerry Bock and Sheldon Harnick make hay of both in the evanescent 1963 Broadway musical She Loves Me (presented by the Huntington Theatre Company at the Boston University Theatre through June 15). You know the drill from the show’s Internet-era edition, the film You’ve Got Mail, not to mention from the 1940 Jimmy Stewart movie The Shop Around the Corner and the 1949 Judy Garland vehicle In the Good Old Summertime, all, like She Loves Me, drawn from Hungarian-born playwright Miklós László’s 1937 play Illatszertár, or Parfumerie. It’s clear László had a marketable idea in his pair of lonely hearts who, when not pouring their feelings into anonymous epistolary amore, work in the same shop and can’t stand each other.

Joe Masteroff’s book for She Loves Me hews to the original setting and period, Budapest in the 1930s (when cigarettes were kept in music boxes rather than relegated to the street), and it’s bolstered by the ebullient, Eastern European–accented score by the Fiddler on the Roof team of Bock and Harnick. The show wasn’t a huge hit in 1963, but original star Barbara Cook is still dining out on the Toscanini’s-worthy ditty “Vanilla Ice Cream.” And a 1993 Scott Ellis–directed Broadway revival reminded folks of the musical’s considerable charm. Now outgoing Huntington Theatre Company artistic director Nicholas Martin makes it his sweet, antic swan song — one that will also serve as his “Good Morning, Good Day” to the Williamstown Theatre Festival, where he takes the artistic reins this summer.

It’s clear that Martin, who entered his Huntington tenure by filling the orchestra pit with water for a splashing Dead End, didn’t want to go out on a sour or anticlimactic note. He would appear to have shaken the Huntington piggy bank vigorously for this lavish if whimsical staging with 13-person orchestra floating above it like a blue heaven. Set designer James Noone provides the tall, revolving and dissolving parfumerie and environs, Robert Morgan the comically vivid yet well-tooled threads. Musical director Charlie Alterman conducts the able musicians on high. And Martin has cast the show to emphasize its dance of nervous romance and old-fashioned musical-comedy shtick, the latter provided not just by the appealing second and third bananas but by unlikely leading man Brooks Ashmanskas, a talented Nathan Lane–alike with a rubber baby face, a lovably awkward air, and a physical dexterity that turns the title tune into one giddy and gratifying caper.

The production, with its rhythmic replication of the daily traffic, tribulations, and tedium of the high-end soap trade, starts a tad slowly. But it soon picks up, the metronomic “Sounds While Selling” giving way to the merry melancholy of shop owner Mr. Maraczek’s reminiscence of his bachelor “Days Gone By,” a tune delivered with seasoned spryness by Tony-winning old pro Dick Latessa. By the time Kate Baldwin’s sparkling-eyed Amalia seats herself on the apron to launch a “Will He Like Me?” that, as she eases the throttle, bursts into full melodious flight, the audience is in heaven like the band.

1  |  2  |  3  |   next >
  Topics: Theater , Entertainment, Business, Nathan Lane,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY CAROLYN CLAY
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   ARTSEMERSON'S METAMORPHOSIS  |  February 28, 2013
    Gisli Örn Garðarsson’s Gregor Samsa is the best-looking bug you will ever see — more likely to give you goosebumps than make your skin crawl.
  •   CLEARING THE AIR WITH STRONG LUNGS AT NEW REP  |  February 27, 2013
    Lungs may not take your breath away, but it's an intelligent juggernaut of a comedy about sex, trust, and just how many people ought to be allowed to blow carbon into Earth's moribund atmosphere.
  •   MORMONS, MURDERERS, AND MARINERS: 10 THEATER SENSATIONS COMING TO BOSTON STAGES THIS SPRING  |  February 28, 2013
    Mitt Romney did his Mormon mission in France. But there are no baguettes or croissants to dip into the lukewarm proselytizing of bumbling elders Price and Cunningham, two young men sent by the Church of Latter-day Saints to convert the unfaithful of a Ugandan backwater in The Book of Mormon .
  •   THE HUMAN STAIN: LIFE AND DEATH IN MIDDLETOWN  |  February 22, 2013
    The New York Times dubbed Will Eno a “Samuel Beckett for the Jon Stewart generation.”
  •   ZEITGEIST STAGE COMPANY'S LIFE OF RILEY  |  February 22, 2013
    Sir Alan Ayckbourn has written more than 70 plays, most of which turn on an intricate trick of chronology or geography.

 See all articles by: CAROLYN CLAY