Beyond the big top

By BILL RODRIGUEZ  |  July 1, 2009

"It's not a book musical, it's much more a concept musical," Smith points out. "So individual input develops the creativity of all the people who interact with them as well. It's that kind of liberalism that permeates everything, and I think it's a really big reason why Cirque is successful and why so many people stay working for the company for a very long time."

New performers stay in Montréal for six to nine months, working on their specific act as well as taking acting and singing and movement classes — and English classes for many, with more than 40 countries represented by the 3500 employees of the organization.

"The creative process that they go through is unlike anything I've seen," Smith says. "The investment the company makes in each artist as an individual makes them feel very respected, so they want to give, they want to come up with fresh ideas — but want to come up with something different, they want to make their mark."

We'll soon be able to see the results of all that trouble. Indications are that we'll be impressed.

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Related: Slideshow: Michael C. Smith's Carnival photography, Play by play: August 21, 2009, Say it loud, More more >
  Topics: Theater , Dunkin' Donuts Center, Dunkin' Donuts Center, Michael Smith,  More more >
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