Gilded stage

By MEGAN GRUMBLING  |  July 29, 2009

As it closes, the tone shifts interestingly in the clown Feste's final ditty, sung by the whole cast and striking in how it marries the classic sensibilities of "movie finale" and period Shakespearean song. The lyrics lightly lament the passage of time in a man's life, and, sung unaccompanied in a minor key, the song holds a curious, timeless melancholy: "A great while ago the world begun,/With hey, ho, the wind and the rain,/But that's all one, our play is done." It hangs ethereally in the last moments of this production, and seems to evoke the wistful passing of several golden ages — of Shakespearean theater, of vaudeville, of the silent movies into the talkies — as well as the spirit of this business that nevertheless endures.

Megan Grumbling can be reached at mgrumbling@hotmail.com.

TWELFTH NIGHT by William Shakespeare | Directed by Janis Stevens | Produced by the Theater at Monmouth | in repertory through August 22 | 207.933.9999

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  Topics: Theater , Buster Keaton, William Shakespeare, William Shakespeare,  More more >
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