Zooma

By BILL RODRIGUEZ  |  November 2, 2009

Our main dishes were even better. Johnnie’s piccata di pollo ($20) consisted of two moist breasts (deliciously skin-on, forgoing heart-healthiness) and tender broccoli rabe. Fat capers topped the chicken, and the light sauce had just enough lemon zip. I had the filetto di vitello con funghi ($24). Four thick strips of veal tenderloin were drenched in a mar-sala sauce and served with mushrooms and nicely rosemaried and browned roasted potatoes. The wine sauce was thick enough to adhere to each bite of meat. I was a happy carni-vore.

On our next visit, I’ll probably try an interesting dish called capasante croccanti ($21), described as pan-seared sea scallops over a house-made semolina torte and fennel pome-granate salad. Or, if my teeth are tingling again, maybe the wood-grilled double-thick pork chop, with potatoes puréed rather than mashed and “house-pickled peppers.”

The desserts included Nutella crème brûlée and pumpkin cheesecake, but we went for the kitchen-made cranberry-apple crustata ($8) and weren’t disappointed with the perfect tart-sweet melding. Zooma proved a treat, even without a summery sidewalk table.

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