MIKE HAZEN: Speaking specifically of those two guys — the Workins and the Renanos — both of those guys came off seasons where they pitched a full season in college — they had started very early at the end of January. Both had had little hiccups physically, you know Renano's a little more pronounced than Workin's. And we just decided at that point in time, at the end of the summer, it wasn't really worth heating those guys up in order to finish off the minor league season. And these guys have covered the topic pretty thoroughly, so nothing much more to add. But the one thing that's changed a little is that guys don't throw as much as amateur players anymore. The guys we get don't play catch all off season. When they go there are specialized programs from little league, high school, college, all the way up, so we don't get probably as developed an arm as maybe we got back in the day, when guys could go out and throw all those innings. It's not about trying to cover our butt with guys being injured, but we don't think it's proper development to get a guy injured. You can't develop an injured player. If someone has surgery, there's no development going on. If they're not pitching, there's no development. You can't just push that guy out there and say, 'power through it' now. The advances in medicine are bringing us to where we have so much more knowledge about the arm, as Mike can probably allude to, and the elbow, and with that knowledge we just don't feel comfortable in a lot of cases just shoving a guy back out there if he's saying his shoulder still bothers him. We may find something in there and we feel it's our responsibility to take care of that before we send that guy back out there. So, that's where I think we have a responsibility, in a lot of cases, to these players.

MIKE REINOLD: I think on our end, medically, when we discuss these situations, everything that Curt brought up and Theo addressed, the development of the player is probably our number one responsibility when we talk about what's best for this player. The only variable that continuously shows to correlate most to injuries is quantity, and that goes back even to little-leaguers and high school kids. The number one factor in how a child or a youth pitcher gets injured is their pitch count and their innings pitched per year. That's been proven over the last three or four years now, with several studies that have shown that. It's not throwing a curve ball or a slider at a young age; it's actually their quantity of pitching. So I think there's a lot of fear that's been developed on our end that we're being sometimes almost a little too protective, but I think Curt said it well when he talked about sometimes you feel well, sometimes you don't, everybody's individualized. When we decide to take a pitcher out of a game from a coaching standpoint, it's probably because they're fatigued. Their body has broken down and they're not repeating their mechanics well, and it's time for that player to come out. Not so much that he hit 100 arbitrarily, though. It's a blend of challenges.

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