Marketing magic

By SHARON STEEL  |  August 15, 2007

Perhaps that’s Disney’s answer, too — loosen up on those deformed, twisty, conglomerate-sized puppet-strings, just a tiny bit. Of course, considering Disney’s late-July promise to ban smoking from Disney-branded films, and discourage it in movies distributed by partners Touchstone and Miramax, the company might be more than overdue for that kind of transformation. In its entire history, Disney has never been able to fully reconcile its saintly ethical code with a ruthless set of business tactics. It’s not very wise to sprinkle too much fairy dust around: you might wind up snorting it by mistake.

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