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Review: Harmony And Me

Softcore mumblecore
By PETER KEOUGH  |  April 15, 2010

This bagatelle from Bob Byington is Greenberg lite, or maybe an edgier The Office, or softcore mumblecore. The title misfit (frequent Andrew Bujalski collaborator and Bishop Allen band member Justin Rice) has just lost his girlfriend.

He also has a meaningless job, oddball friends, and an eccentric family, and they all have funny lines (though Harmony’s trademark conversation opener, “She broke my heart and she hasn’t finished breaking it,” gets old fast). Near the end of the film, Harmony’s ex-girlfriend (Kristen Tucker) confesses that he’s like a character in a movie whom, she realizes halfway through the story, she doesn’t care about.

That doesn’t happen here — partly because the scenes are so non-sequitur and the dialogue is so offhand that half the time it doesn’t seem like a movie at all.

  Topics: Reviews , Entertainment, Movies, Andrew Bujalski,  More more >
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