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Review: Welcome To The Rileys

Almost as embarrassing as Black Snake Moan
By PETER KEOUGH  |  October 26, 2010
1.5 1.5 Stars

It seemed that Kristen Stewart might be expanding her range with her roles in The Runaways and Adventureland. But in Jake Scott's unwholesome melodrama, her performance suggests her Twilight character playing a 16-year-old runaway stripper/hooker in the high-school play. Call her Bella du Jour.

Desperate, kooky, and needy, Stewart's waif pesters mopy Doug (James Galdofini), a straying husband who catches her act while at a plumbing convention in New Orleans. Doug rebuffs her come-ons, but something about her reminds him of his deceased teenage daughter, and the resemblance inspires him to unclog her toilet and remake the girl's life. Meanwhile, Doug's wife, Lois (Melissa Leo), shakes off her agoraphobia and drives down to the Big Easy to find out what's going on.

What follows is almost as embarrassing as Black Snake Moan — all the more so because nobody involved in the film seems to recognize how icky it all is.

  Topics: Reviews , Entertainment, Movies, Melissa Leo,  More more >
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