FIND MOVIES
Movie List
Loading ...
or
Find Theaters and Movie Times
or
Search Movies

Review: Biutiful

A pretentious and maudlin indulgence
By PETER KEOUGH  |  February 24, 2011
1.5 1.5 Stars

Alejandro González Iñárritu's arty tearjerker is kind of like 127 Hours — you know how the film is going to end, and you wish it would just get it over with. He does have a knack for eye-catching openings; here the voices of a father and a daughter are heard over a serene, snowed-in wood. Things get pretty cluttered after that. Uxbal, played by Javier Bardem in a performance more tormented than the one in The Sea Inside, is a black-market operator in Barcelona. No wonder he's miserable: he has to deal with a promiscuous, bipolar ex-wife, two stressed-out kids, a police crackdown on his street vendors, and a basement full of illegal workers. To top it off, he's peeing blood. And you thought the guy in Russell Banks's Continental Drift had it tough. A turgid entry in a morbid trend that includes Hereafter and Enter the Void, Biutiful is a pretentious and maudlin indulgence in melodramatic overkill. In short, an Oscar nomination for Bardem.

  Topics: Reviews , Entertainment, Movies, Javier Bardem,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY PETER KEOUGH
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   BUFFET DINING: THE 15TH BOSTON UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 19, 2013
    "Copraphagy" is a key word at this year's Boston Underground Film Festival at the Brattle.
  •   REVIEW: GINGER & ROSA  |  March 19, 2013
    Sally Potter likes to mess around with form and narrative.
  •   UNDERGROUND CINEMA: THE 12TH BOSTON TURKISH FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 12, 2013
    This year's Boston Turkish Film Festival includes works in which directors ponder the relationships between the secular and the religious, between men and women, and between destiny and identity.
  •   REVIEW: A GLIMPSE INSIDE THE MIND OF CHARLES SWAN III  |  March 12, 2013
    In Roman Coppola's sophomoric second feature (his 2001 debut CQ was promising), Charlie Sheen shows restraint as the titular asshole, a dissolute ad designer and solipsistic whiner who's mooning over the loss of his latest love.
  •   REVIEW: UPSIDE DOWN  |  March 14, 2013
    Had Ed Wood Jr. directed Fritz Lang's Metropolis , he couldn't have achieved the earnest dopiness of Juan Solanas's sci-fi allegory — nor the striking images.

 See all articles by: PETER KEOUGH