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Review: Elektra Luxx

Porn satire that's neither satiric nor sexy.
By PETER KEOUGH  |  March 10, 2011
2.0 2.0 Stars

Sebastián Gutiérrez joins the ranks of directors who have employed their wives or loved ones as sex objects in their pictures. Unfortunately, he has none of the talent of a Jean-Luc Godard or even a Brian De Palma. A sequel to Gutiérrez's Women in Trouble (I didn't see it either), this picks up the story of the title porn star (Carla Gugino, Gutiérrez's SO) just after she quits her career, having become pregnant by a now deceased rock star (Josh Brolin, appearing here as a photograph). The premise provides a framework for a variety of half-baked narratives ranging from a flashback where Elektra visits her identical twin sister (Gugino) in prison to a visitation from the Blessed Virgin Mary (an uncredited cameo from Julianne Moore - how does he get these people?). There's also a parallel, unfunny storyline about a would-be erotic-film blogger trying to do live-streaming, Rupert Pupkin-like, from his mother's basement. In other words, a porn satire that's neither satiric nor sexy.

  Topics: Reviews , Julianne Moore, Josh Brolin, review,  More more >
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