FIND MOVIES
Movie List
Loading ...
or
Find Theaters and Movie Times
or
Search Movies

Review: Another Earth

Twisted psychology
By PETER KEOUGH  |  July 26, 2011
2.5 2.5 Stars



Apparently it's getting harder to meet compatible partners these days in independent movies. Some disaster or random act must intervene. For example, grieving mother Nicole Kidman hooks up with the driver who ran down her child in Rabbit Hole, and Miranda July's slacker hits on a guy whose phone number she finds on the back of a drawing in The Future. In Mike Cahill's debut, Rhoda (Brit Marling, who also co-wrote) hits on John (William Mapother), the surviving father of the family she wiped out in a drunk-driving accident. That's a compelling enough premise, but then scientists discover a planetary double for the earth suddenly appearing in the sky, and that becomes a duplicate, underdeveloped storyline for the film. Cahill and Marling demonstrate a knack for detail and twisted psychology, and had they been satisfied with one planet this might have been a more impressive effort. They should have saved the other earth for another movie.

  Topics: Reviews , Boston, Nicole Kidman, Miranda July,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY PETER KEOUGH
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   BUFFET DINING: THE 15TH BOSTON UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 19, 2013
    "Copraphagy" is a key word at this year's Boston Underground Film Festival at the Brattle.
  •   REVIEW: GINGER & ROSA  |  March 19, 2013
    Sally Potter likes to mess around with form and narrative.
  •   UNDERGROUND CINEMA: THE 12TH BOSTON TURKISH FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 12, 2013
    This year's Boston Turkish Film Festival includes works in which directors ponder the relationships between the secular and the religious, between men and women, and between destiny and identity.
  •   REVIEW: A GLIMPSE INSIDE THE MIND OF CHARLES SWAN III  |  March 12, 2013
    In Roman Coppola's sophomoric second feature (his 2001 debut CQ was promising), Charlie Sheen shows restraint as the titular asshole, a dissolute ad designer and solipsistic whiner who's mooning over the loss of his latest love.
  •   REVIEW: UPSIDE DOWN  |  March 14, 2013
    Had Ed Wood Jr. directed Fritz Lang's Metropolis , he couldn't have achieved the earnest dopiness of Juan Solanas's sci-fi allegory — nor the striking images.

 See all articles by: PETER KEOUGH