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Review: The Names of Love

Softcore sex and politics
By PETER KEOUGH  |  August 16, 2011
1.5 1.5 Stars



The daughter of a hippie and an Algerian immigrant, bubbly Baya (Sara Forestier) is a free spirit who sleeps with right-wingers to convert them to liberal views. Well, why not? Nothing else seems to work, and it gives director Michel Leclerc more opportunities to show her tits. Plus, Baya sure is kooky: she's so absentminded she walks outside with no clothes on! Then she meets Arthur (Jacques Gamblin), a scientist who's not right-wing, but who, like her, has a secret. Baya's secret is that she was molested as a child, hence her promiscuousness; his is that his mother escaped the Holocaust, hence his reserve. Child abuse, genocide — those French have a way with romantic comedies. Leclerc augments his softcore sex and politics with pseudo–Woody Allen touches, like having Arthur's grandparents — killed in Auschwitz — show up to make funny comments on his love life. A meretricious mix of lechery, kitsch, bad taste, and glib political correctness.

  Topics: Reviews , Politics, Boston, softcore,  More more >
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