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Review: Griff the Invisible

Downtrodden superheroes
By PETER KEOUGH  |  August 23, 2011
2.5 2.5 Stars



Like Kick-Ass and Super, Leon Ford's Griff the Invisible reaffirms the notion that superheroes exist to provide the meek and marginalized with an empowering fantasy. You can be a loser in normal life but that's just a secret identity covering up your true self as a costumed crime fighter — if only in your imagination. Griff (True Blood's Ryan Kwanten), for example, works in an office, but after hours puts on a rubber suit and rids the streets of Sydney of evil and injustice. Too bad he can't do something about the biggest evil in his life: Tony the office bully. So Griff develops an invisibility suit made with baking soda and lemon juice. Meanwhile, Melody (Maeve Dermody), equally ill at ease with reality, is learning the secret of walking through walls. Might these two freaks, both striving to attain a form of insubstantiality, hit it off? First-time director Leon Ford has the Australian shaggy dog comedy style down pat; now he just needs an empowering idea.

  Topics: Reviews , Boston, Kick Ass, Tony,  More more >
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