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Review: Abduction

Beautiful but boring
By PETER KEOUGH  |  September 27, 2011
1.5 1.5 Stars



Taylor Lautner plays characters with mysterious origins and makes them boring. He can transform a teen werewolf or, as in John Singleton's inept thriller, a high schooler with a Jason Bourne background, into pec-baring banality. Nathan seems a normal, spoiled kid. True, his dad nearly beats him to death during a boxing lesson, but otherwise he's got the adolescent asshole thing down pat. Yet he still feels like a freak, and when he and his classmate Karen (Lily Collins) go online to a site for missing kids while researching a sociology paper, he begins to discover why. Pursued by the CIA and some creepy Serbians, Nathan and Karen follow a trail of dead people, cell phone calls, and awkward exposition that leads to a Pirates game where the final revelation is slightly less exciting than the action on the field. The supporting cast includes Maria Bello, Sigourney Weaver, and Alfred Molina, who are cruelly used — sometimes literally.

  Topics: Reviews , Boston, abduction, plot,  More more >
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