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Review: Restless

Death-obsessed teens in love
By PETER KEOUGH  |  September 27, 2011
1.5 1.5 Stars



Gus Van Sant's Restless follows a similar template to Jonathan Levin's 50/50 (read our review here), with more precious results. Enoch (Dennis's son Henry Hopper) doesn't have cancer, but he is obsessed with death, crashing funerals when he's not visiting his parents' graves. While engaged in the former he bumps into Annabel (Mia Wasikowska), a free spirit with a post–Annie Hall wardrobe. She's kooky — and she's going to die! Stricken with incurable brain cancer and with three months to live, she's the perfect girl for Enoch. In lieu of Seth Rogen's best buddy, Enoch pals around with the ghost of a Japanese kamikaze pilot; they bond over games of Battleship. By the time the quirky pair rehearse Annabel's final words you might be asking, "Death, where is thy sting?"

  Topics: Reviews , details, adolescence, young,  More more >
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