FIND MOVIES
Movie List
Loading ...
or
Find Theaters and Movie Times
or
Search Movies



"My father lived in shadows," says filmmaker Carl Colby in voiceover. "He liked being invisible." His documentary is a valiant but ultimately futile attempt to understand William Colby, the ex-CIA head who died in 1996. Who could figure out this close-to-the-vest cold fish who revealed nothing personal to anyone, certainly not to his family, but spent the best days of his life involved in frightening intelligence schemes, including assassinations, while representing the USA? It was Colby who was behind Operation Phoenix in Vietnam, which allowed for the torture and killings of ostensible enemies of the South Vietnamese government. For this reprehensible work, Colby was appointed head of the CIA by Richard Nixon, and soon aided Tricky Dick with his illegal political operations. A great guy? Not really, and fortunately son Carl Colby avoids sentimentalizing his dad. Or really forgiving William Colby his sins as a bloody cold warrior, and as a bloodless, distant father.

  Topics: Reviews , Boston, short take, in theaters,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY GERALD PEARY
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   REVIEW: LIKE SOMEONE IN LOVE  |  March 12, 2013
    A decent little movie, but hardly a major one, from Iran's master filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami, who, self-exiled, here shoots in Tokyo with an all-Japanese cast.
  •   REVIEW: THE GATEKEEPERS  |  February 26, 2013
    Great cinema journalism, The Gatekeepers was the National Society of Film Critics' winner for Best Documentary of 2012.
  •   REVIEW: THE LITTLE FUGITIVE (1953)  |  February 27, 2013
    It's the 60th anniversary of this pioneering American independent feature, which greatly influenced both cinema vérité documentarians and the French New Wave.
  •   REVIEW: HOW TO RE-ESTABLISH A VODKA EMPIRE  |  February 20, 2013
    Daniel Edelstyn launched this film project after reading the spirited diary of his late grandmother, Maroussia Zorokovich, whose wealthy Jewish family split from Ukraine as the Bolsheviks were taking control.
  •   REVIEW: HAPPY PEOPLE: A YEAR IN THE TAIGA  |  February 12, 2013
    What Robert Flaherty did with title cards in his silent Nanook of the North , Werner Herzog manages with declamatory voiceover in Happy People : romanticization of the austere, self-reliant lives of hunters and trappers in the icebound north.

 See all articles by: GERALD PEARY