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Review: Project X

Done before and better
By PETER KEOUGH  |  March 1, 2012
1.5 1.5 Stars



When you start making negative comparisons to films like Porky's, you know a film has problems. Drawing on the desperately overdone narrative device of found footage, Nima Nourizadeh's Project X supposedly consists of video cobbled from various sources, but mostly shot by teenaged Dax (Dax Flame), the only interesting character but invisible for the most part behind the camera. He's documenting a birthday bash for Thomas (Thomas Mann) that his nerdy pals have put together by means of the Internet. And yes, it's so Thomas can get laid. With his impressive but unlikely camerawork, Dax looks like he's got a future in film. What he needs is a good script writer. Most of what happens here has been done before and better. What differs is the narrative gimmick, the charmlessness of the characters, and the magnitude of the debauchery and devastation. The music rocks, however, so you might get the soundtrack and play it at your own party.

  Topics: Reviews , Internet, Music, rating,  More more >
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