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Review: Safe

A lot of blood
By PETER KEOUGH  |  May 1, 2012
2.5 2.5 Stars



There actually is a safe in Boaz Yakin's Safe, but you have to wade through a lot of blood to get there, and then more after that. Starting with the opening scene, as the Russian mob interrogates 11-year-old Mei (Catherine Chan), a girl with an eidetic memory and genius math skills who has been employed by a rival Triads gang as a human computer. Next the Russians ("You know the Russians," a character says ruefully) execute the pregnant wife of cage fighter Luke Wright (Jason Statham) because he refused to take a dive. Plus his opponent ended up in a coma, so that's another thing for him to feel guilty about. What do these events have in common, besides gratuitous brutality? After a jumble of opening flashbacks and a nutty dénouement involving intrigue in high places, you'll be sorry you asked. But Statham, at first infuriatingly passive, doesn't disappoint when he finally kicks ass, and Mei, whom he's ostensibly protecting, proves the toughest one of all.

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