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More somber was the discussion conducted by filmmaker Mary Harron (American Psycho) with Kirby Dick. Comparing the institutions he investigated in This Film Is Not Rated (2006), about the Hollywood rating system, and in Twist of Faith (2004), about the sexual abuse scandal in the Catholic Church, he said, "My film had no impact on the MPAA. I don't know which is more recalcitrant, the Catholic Church or the MPAA."

But he was more optimistic about the effect of his new film (also shown at the festival), The Invisible War, a shocking exposé of rape in the armed forces. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta asked to see it and two days later announced long-overdue changes in how sexual assault crimes would be investigated and prosecuted by the military.

"The most important thing for people to do right now is see the film," Dick said. "That alone will send a message."

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