FIND MOVIES
Movie List
Loading ...
or
Find Theaters and Movie Times
or
Search Movies

Review: Somewhere Between

By BETSY SHERMAN  |  October 18, 2012
3.0 3.0 Stars



Upon her adoption of a Chinese baby girl, filmmaker Linda Goldstein Knowlton wondered how, in years to come, her daughter would view her racial identity, her roots in China, and the family who abandoned her because of her gender. So the filmmaker befriended a community of teenage Chinese-American adoptees, and made this engrossing documentary portrait of four of these girls. All live in comfortable homes with Caucasian families. One, a violinist whose goal is to perform at the Grand Ole Opry, says she's a banana, yellow on the outside, white on the inside. But her story takes an intense turn as she joins other adoptees who travel to Chinese villages looking for faces that mirror their own. One girl makes it her mission to find an American family to adopt a disabled orphan. Another has an epiphany that her manic drive to excel could be an attempt to prove her worth to the family who gave her up. These are young women well worth listening to, and Somewhere Between does so with grace and respect.

  Topics: Reviews , Entertainment, China, movie,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY BETSY SHERMAN
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   REVIEW: IDENTITY THIEF  |  February 20, 2013
    Seth Gordon directs this funny, though formulaic, mismatched-duo comedy in which Jason Bateman's straight-laced family man must nab Melissa McCarthy, the identity thief who has ruined his credit, and haul her from Florida to Denver for prosecution.
  •   REVIEW: OSCAR NOMINATED SHORTS: DOCUMENTARY  |  January 30, 2013
    For this year's program of Oscar-nominated documentary shorts, it's best to bring tissues. Things can get emotional.
  •   REVIEW: THE OSCAR NOMINATED SHORT FILMS: LIVE ACTION AND ANIMATED  |  January 30, 2013
    Highlights of the live-action shorts include the beautifully direct performances by Somali refugees in "Asad," a contemporary story (with folkloric undertones) of a boy who wants to be a pirate; the del Toro–esque fantasy setting of "Death of a Shadow"; the blend of dark comedy and gritty drama in the New York story of a little girl and her black-sheep uncle, "Curfew"; and the warmth of memory giving way to cold reality for an elderly man in "Henry."
  •   REVIEW: A LIAR'S AUTOBIOGRAPHY  |  January 25, 2013
    The discovery of tapes of Graham Chapman reading from his 1980 A Liar’s Autobiography has made it possible for the expired Monty Python member to star, posthumously, in his own biopic.
  •   REVIEW: PARENTAL GUIDANCE  |  January 02, 2013
    Billy Crystal and Bette Midler star in what could have been a decent comedy, if director Andy Fickman hadn't made it such a tearjerker.

 See all articles by: BETSY SHERMAN