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Review: Deadfall

By PETER KEOUGH  |  December 6, 2012
2.0 2.0 Stars



Holiday get-togethers traditionally spark family conflict, but this is ridiculous. June (Sissy Spacek) and Chet (Kris Kristofferson) plan to have a quiet Thanksgiving at their Michigan farmhouse. Unbeknownst to them, their prodigal son Jay (Charlie Hunnam) has been paroled from prison and wants to join the feast. But then he accidentally kills somebody and flees the heat . Meanwhile, gun-happy Addison (Eric Bana) and his sister Liza (Olivia Wilde), who are also on the lam, split up and agree to meet later when one of them finds a safe house. Jay bumps into Liza, falls in love, and wants to bring her home for Thanksgiving. Recognizing an ideal hideout, Liza calls in her brother. By that time, the body count is in double digits, and the subarctic conditions and a woman cop in the cast make comparisons to Fargo even more invidious. To his credit, director Stefan Ruzowitzky seems to be attempting a critique of patriarchy, since all the men are assholes and the women are victims.

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